Alchemy. Ancient Authors & Hidden Evidences. Ancient treatises translations and commentaries as well as presentations of hidden evidences in myths, art, nature and science history in an attempt to reunify disconnected cultures and prove that Alchemy has a good chance to be the basis of all ancient religions myths.

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Deprive the body of body and that which has no body provide a body. Rosarium Philosophorum. In ancient Greek there was a pun on θεῖον (Theîon), meaning “from Gods, Sacred“ and θεῖος (Theîos), meaning Sulphur. In fact there is no difference between spiritual and operative Alchemy, they are exactly the same thing and their goals are exactly the same: “Spirit is the best solvent”. Nevertheless any natural mass isn’t reputed to contain any Spirit. While any mind (of any consistency) is commonly reputed to contain a certain amount of it. Under “Spirit” I mean a real physical entity dwelling both in the sky and in the depth of the earth and bodies. waterfall1

Our Alchemical works suggest to have Sulphur/Soul extracted by Mercurius/Spirit. So it is hardly a purely contemplative and imaginative Opera. They who know what Spirit/Secret Fire is and what it is for, know what Alchemy is. Not what Alchemy is for, yet. Metals killed in a certain way can germinate again, as their forms endure over the time in the materials that had made their graves.This concept, known as Magisterium Corpi, is what Alchemy is for, and along with the key concept of Secret Fire it can clash dangerously with certain religious beliefs. Because this notion can be extended to reigns other than mineral. This takes us back to very ancient times, when the places of Nature were sacred just because of the trails left by Water, Wind, Steam, Rock, Sun, Moon and Stars. But, at that time, our sacred substance was materially and effectively extracted with the help of the Sky and Earth.

When the nature of the gods disappears, there appears the nature of things. Cicero.

“The prototype or archetype of the human being is therefore not nature understood as a set of physical-psychic laws, but the spirit, a world that, if it goes beyond the natural sphere, never abandons it altogether, indeed it vivifies it, gives it a new dimension (Compared to that of the three kingdoms), that of the human.” – From The Face of the Gods, Walter Friedrich Otto

The concept of spirit in ancient iconography was made with billowing veils, smoke, winged animals, deformed lines, refractions of light, the world of dreams, memory and especially in the poetics of the Underworld, then immortality ( which in medieval times will become the poetics of AMOR).

First of all, the name. Ancient treatises translations and commentaries as well as presentations of hidden evidences in myths, art, nature and science history in an attempt to reunify disconnected cultures and prove that Alchemy has a good chance to be the basis of all ancient religions myths.

The main temple of Thoth was placed exactly in the city of Khemenu, it contained the famous Chamber of Darkness, and the ritual, described in the “Book of Thoth”, was held there. Interestingly enough, the patroness of the city was the goddess Wenet. Her name means “the swift one”, and her symbol is the running hare. Moreover, if you look at her name, it obviously starts with the hieroglyph wn, which is a picture of a running hare. There’s no generally accepted explanation why this “woman-hare” was attached to the city of Thoth. Then, if we move forward to the process itself, there is a whole bag of familiar symbolism – snakes, toads, lions etc.

But it is really overwhelming. Judaic and Christian myths are but a small fables, bricks really, in the immense monument of their cosmology… We can’t help but do feel like ignorant pygmies before the vastness of Egyptian tradition.Difficulty is to restore the relevance between that original Alchemy and what we know as Alchemy in European tradition. amassis-dionysus-offering-hare-to-demetra-persephone1

From above: scenes from Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, attributed to Andrea Mantegna’s school; Greek vascular art portraying Dionysus offering a hare to Demetra and Persephone, Amassis painter c. 560–515 bc;  Pegasus,  Apulian red figure 360-350 B.C. fragment of krater, now Tampa Museum of Art; header image from stuccos ceilings from one of the cubicula in Agrippa’s villa in Palazzo Massimo alle Terme Trastevere, Villa della Farnesina.